Tag Archives: facebook

Facebook hires a Pixar Illustrator to re-imagine the emoticon

 

Emoticons have been around ever since the world wide web became fairly prominent in our daily lives. There are thousands of different variations, designs, animals, really any type you can imagine. Facebook, however, thinks that they can do better. They recently hired famed Pixar illustrator Matt Jones to re-invent the emoticon all together.

“Facebook was canny enough to realize that traditional emoticons are quite bland,” says Jones. “At Pixar we consider emotional states every day with every drawing we make. Our work is informed by the years of study we do, constantly studying people’s gestures and expressions in real life.” (To be clear, it isn’t an official collaboration between Pixar and Facebook. Jones is working independently.)

Jones was studying facial expressions for his work on a new film by Pete Docter (director of Up and Monsters, Inc.), which takes place in the mind of a young girl coming of age. The film, referred to as The Untitled Pixar Movie That Takes You Inside the Mind, is set for release in June 2015. Pixar is famous for bringing to life inanimate, and even mundane, objects: lamps, cars, a hockey puck. This film required an extra level of emotional detail. A young girl’s mental state is a complicated thing.

Docter brought in psychologist Paul Ekman, a pioneer in the research of facial expressions, as a consultant on micro-emotions, the small mini expressions that happen between more major ones. (You may have heard of Ekman as John Cleese’s collaborator on the BBC series, The Human Face.) At the same time, Ekman’s protégé, Dacher Keltner, codirector of University of California-Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Program, was starting work with Facebook to improve their emoticons. When Keltner heard about the project at Pixar, he approached the company. That’s how he found Jones.

Keltner started off by giving Jones some of the classic universal emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) to translate into emoticon-style drawings. He loved what he saw — and decided to up the ante. He handed over Charles Darwin’s The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, which Darwin published 13 years after On the Origin of Species. The book explores similarities between human and animal facial movements, in support of Darwin’s theory that humans and animals have a common ancestor. It became one of the seminal works on the facial emotive expressions.

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The term “Facebook” is involved in 1/3 of all divorce proceedings in the UK

Last year, Raleigh, North Carolina attorneys reported that Facebook and MySpace were involved in most divorce cases due to a spouse’s inappropriate behavior on such social networking sites. Now, it seems the UK has the same complaint.

Divorce-Online, a UK divorce website, conducted a survey consisting of 5,000 people in 2009 and 2011. The participants were asked a series of questions regarding their spouse’s behavior, which included their online behavior.

According to the survey’s results, 20 percent of behavior petitions in 2009 contained the word Facebook. In 2011, this number jumped to 33 percent.

Other social networking sites didn’t reach that high of a percentage. For instance, Twitter was only at 20 percent in 2011, and the problem associated with the network is that spouse’s used it to make comments about exes.

However, the reasons for listing Facebook on the behavior petitions were inappropriate messages sent to a person of the opposite sex, Facebook friends reporting spouse’s behavior, and separated spouses posting harsh comments about each other.

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#youngyourprofile Movement begins

#Youngyourprofile

Change your profile picture to you as a little(r) kid and if you have timeline use a childhood related cover photo too. Change your first name to Young and your last name to your first name, and boom, you’re now part of what all the cool kids are doing. There’s really no rhyme or reason for it, it’s similar to the disney profile pictures or pokemon profile pictures but this time you get to see what people looked like when they were weird looking little kids. PLUS it’s funny, and hides all of those pictures of you drinking and getting weird with friends from potential employers when they search your name. LET’S MAKE IT A FACEBOOK REVOLUTION!

These cool kids have already made the change and their lives are already improving:

Update:

More and more and more people. #YOUNGYOURPROFILE

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Be a decent human for once and become an organ donor…. on Facebook

For the last couple days, Mark Zuckerberg has been talking about an awesome new life-saving feature coming soon to Facebook. So what is it? Well… you can now share with the world on your timeline that you’re an organ donor.

Facebook explains the new feature:

With the addition of “organ donor” to the Life Events section of timeline, you can state your intention to become an organ donor, and share your story about when, where or why you decided to become a donor. If you are not officially registered as an organ donor, sign up with the appropriate registry.

To add that you’re an organ donor to your Timeline, you have to follow the following instructions:

-Click Life Event at the top of your timeline
-Select Health & Wellness
-Select Organ Donor
-Select your audience and click Save
-The company says that the feature “is only available in some countries,” providing links to registries in both the US and UK, so it could be limited on launch day and roll out wider as Facebook partners with donation charities and organisations around the world.

Yesterday, it was revealed that Mark Zuckerberg and company had something up its sleeves and would announce it this morning on “Good Morning America”. During the exclusive interview, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg will show the world a new tool that “has the power to save lives from their new Menlo Park, CA headquarters”.

In the release, Zuckerberg and Sandberg noted:

Facebook’s mission is simple: to make the world more open and connected. But the Facebook community has also shown us that simply through sharing and connecting, the world gets smaller and better. Even one individual can have an outsized impact on the challenges facing another, and on the world. At Facebook, we call that the power of friends.

So that’s cool, and certainly might increase the number of people who are organ donors, but on Zuck’s two day talk show spree, I hate to sound cynical, but I expected more. Some people were thinking it might be some new anti-cyberbullying tool, or an emergency alert system through FB, when this is basically just one more checkbox to check in your profile. It’s cool that they’re doing it, but not quite as groundbreaking as everyone thought.

Via

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God dammit

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Perfect

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What would you do if you were asked for your Facebook username and password during a job interview?

These days, you have to expect that if you’re applying for a job that your employer might take a look at your Facebook page to make sure you’re not a complete idiot that’s going to embarrass the company. But more job seekers are finding that they’re being asked for their Facebook password as well, so the prospective employer can see your private profile.

When Justin Bassett interviewed for a new job, he expected the usual questions about experience and references. So he was astonished when the interviewer asked for something else: his Facebook username and password.

Bassett, a New York City statistician, had just finished answering a few character questions when the interviewer turned to her computer to search for his Facebook page. But she couldn’t see his private profile. She turned back and asked him to hand over his login information.

Bassett refused and withdrew his application, saying he didn’t want to work for a company that would seek such personal information. But as the job market steadily improves, other job candidates are confronting the same question from prospective employers, and some of them cannot afford to say no.

In their efforts to vet applicants, some companies and government agencies are going beyond merely glancing at a person’s social networking profiles and instead asking to log in as the user to have a look around.

“It’s akin to requiring someone’s house keys,’’ said Orin Kerr, a George Washington University law professor and former federal prosecutor who calls it “an egregious privacy violation.’’

Questions have been raised about the legality of the practice, which is also the focus of proposed legislation in Illinois and Maryland that would forbid public agencies from asking for access to social networks.

Since the rise of social networking, it has become common for managers to review publically available Facebook profiles, Twitter accounts and other sites to learn more about job candidates. But many users, especially on Facebook, have their profiles set to private, making them available only to selected people or certain networks.

Companies that don’t ask for passwords have taken other steps — such as asking applicants to friend human resource managers or to log in to a company computer during an interview. Once employed, some workers have been required to sign non-disparagement agreements that ban them from talking negatively about an employer on social media.

I don’t see how companies see this as even remotely cool. It is like asking for your house keys. You come to a job interview, you’re dressed well, you speak well… what business is it of theirs what your bedroom and bathroom look like? If you’ve marked certain things as private on Facebook, they’re private, not part of your public persona and it’s none of an employer’s business.

Read more here

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This made me laugh so hard my professor made me put my laptop in my backpack

For all you idiots who share/like this type of stupid shit.

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