Daily Archives: 05/03/2012

The Elder Scrolls Online MMO is coming out next year

When Elder Scrolls: Skyrim came out, many began wondering when or if Bethesda would actually come out with an Elder Scrolls MMO. Next year, friend. Today, Bethesda announced that Elder Scrolls Online would be coming out some time in 2013.

Set a millennium before the events of Bethesda’s last The Elder Scrolls game, Skyrim, The Elder Scrolls Online will take place across all of Tamriel during a time when daedric prince Molag Bal is wreaking havoc on the realm. The game will feature three player factions and PvP combat. Presumably you’ll be able to travel across the entire world of The Elder Scrolls—Game Informer mentions recurring areas Elsweyr, Skyrim, and Cyrodiil as locations in the MMORPG.

“We have been working hard to create an online world in which players will be able to experience the epic Elder Scrolls universe with their friends, something fans have long said they wanted,” director Matt Firor said in a press release. Firor previously worked on fantasy MMORPG Dark Age of Camelot. “It will be extremely rewarding finally to unveil what we have been developing the last several years. The entire team is committed to creating the best MMO ever made – and one that is worthy of The Elder Scrolls franchise.”

Via

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Surprise!

Tagged , , , , ,

Italian literature is extremely tough to beat

“ Sooner or later in life everyone discovers that perfect happiness is unrealizable, but there are few who pause to consider the antithesis: that perfect unhappiness is equally unattainable. ”
Primo Levi

#youngyourprofile Movement begins

#Youngyourprofile

Change your profile picture to you as a little(r) kid and if you have timeline use a childhood related cover photo too. Change your first name to Young and your last name to your first name, and boom, you’re now part of what all the cool kids are doing. There’s really no rhyme or reason for it, it’s similar to the disney profile pictures or pokemon profile pictures but this time you get to see what people looked like when they were weird looking little kids. PLUS it’s funny, and hides all of those pictures of you drinking and getting weird with friends from potential employers when they search your name. LET’S MAKE IT A FACEBOOK REVOLUTION!

These cool kids have already made the change and their lives are already improving:

Update:

More and more and more people. #YOUNGYOURPROFILE

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thinking in a foreign language makes people make more rational decisions

A series of experiments on more than 300 people from the U.S. and Korea found that thinking in a second language reduced deep-seated, misleading biases that unduly influence how risks and benefits are perceived. In other words— in order to think clearly about a problem, it’s best to do so in a foreign language.

“Would you make the same decisions in a foreign language as you would in your native tongue?” asked psychologists led by Boaz Keysar of the University of Chicago in an April 18 Psychological Science study.

“It may be intuitive that people would make the same choices regardless of the language they are using, or that the difficulty of using a foreign language would make decisions less systematic. We discovered, however, that the opposite is true: Using a foreign language reduces decision-making biases,” wrote Keysar’s team.

Psychologists say human reasoning is shaped by two distinct modes of thought: one that’s systematic, analytical and cognition-intensive, and another that’s fast, unconscious and emotionally charged.

In light of this, it’s plausible that the cognitive demands of thinking in a non-native, non-automatic language would leave people with little leftover mental horsepower, ultimately increasing their reliance on quick-and-dirty cogitation. Equally plausible, however, is that communicating in a learned language forces people to be deliberate, reducing the role of potentially unreliable instinct. Research also shows that immediate emotional reactions to emotively charged words are muted in non-native languages, further hinting at deliberation.

To investigate these possibilities, Keysar’s team developed several tests based on scenarios originally proposed by psychologist Daniel Kahneman, who in 2002 won a Nobel Prize in economics for his work on prospect theory, which describes how people intuitively perceive risk.

In one famous example, Kahneman showed that, given the hypothetical option of saving 200 out of 600 lives, or taking a chance that would either save all 600 lives or none at all, people prefer to save the 200 — yet when the problem is framed in terms of losing lives, many more people prefer the all-or-nothing chance rather than accept a guaranteed loss of 400 lives.

Via

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Man gives up money, is doing fine.

This sort of story has always appealed to me. The kind that inspire me to think a little differently, maybe change my approach to life, even if only by a fraction of a degree. This dude is maybe a little too extreme for me, I don’t really want to be living in a cave  – unless that cave is on a remote island off the Indonesian mainland, spitting distance from a perfect right, but he’s inspiring none the less. He gave up money, and has been living without it for years.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Try not to finish this super addicting game: Space is Key

Space is Key is the name of the game and it is extremely addicting. It might be the sarcastic/smart ass comments that just make you want to beat it really bad, or maybe that insane music. Either way it’s hard to start. Here is my score. Try and beat it, I dare you. Play the game HERE

Tagged , , ,
%d bloggers like this: